What We Think About

In the early 90’s I had a unique and rare opportunity to work with Elizabeth Taylor.  I was 25-years-old and her “Director of Public Relations.”  My job was overseeing her fragrance tours, licensing agreements and AIDS work.

We’ve helped a number of XUS brands across a spectrum of categories come to the Americas. The following “manifesto” is 
LOCC’s best practices for COMING TO AMERICA.

Part II focuses on E-Commerce – we are evolving into an e-commerce society.  Successful brands are largely, totally or partially sold online.  
We examine how.

We’ve helped a number of XUS brands across a spectrum of categories come to the Americas. The following “manifesto” is LOCC’s best practices for COMING TO AMERICA.

In Part II we cover Retail Needs: Despite what you may think, US retail is very different than anywhere else - if for no other reason than scale.

Coming to America: US Market Entry Guideline

We’ve helped a number of XUS brands across a spectrum of categories come to the Americas.  The following “manifesto” is LOCC’s best practices for COMING TO AMERICA.
Three sections cover: Business Set up,  Retail Needs and E-Commerce 

LOCC was contracted by a large, global firm to consult on a multi-million dollar account.  The client needed to hear some hard “truths” about the state of the brand and its needs. 

Every marketing professional of a certain age knows the story about the 1984 Super Bowl commercial introducing the Apple MAC.  It went against every convention. It was audacious and bold.  It was visionary – filled with ‘never-befores’.  And most campaigns in that vein face the same sorts of hurdles that it did: The Board hated the ad.  It was expensive.  The Super Bowl was NOT the coveted advertising and launch vehicle it is today.

I was invited to address a group marketing professionals.  The premise was “brand storytelling.”  The Q&A sparked a lot of conversation and confusion about how to make a “me too” story stand out.  

 

During the middle ages and the Renaissance, the role of the “fool” or Court Jester was actually an ennobled calling.  Believe it or not, his job was to tell the King truths that the aristocracy was afraid to say.